.

.

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Georges Méliès' A Trip to the Moon


It is one of the most iconic images of cinema history: the Man in the Moon being hit in the eye by a steel and rivet rocket capsule. It captures, at the same time, everything quaint and fantastical about silent film and Scientific Romances. Though lasting a mere 14 minutes, Georges Méliès' 1902 film A Trip to the Moon transports viewers to an amazing world where shimmering stars are beautiful women, the astronomer and the astrologer are indistinguishable, and all that is needed to reach the moon is a healthy dose of magic and a very large gun.

Wednesday, 7 September 2016

What Are Scientific Romances?

On the day I started writing this article, a warm fire crackled in the hearth, snow fell outside the window, and a cup of English tea steamed at my elbow. A setting like that — a cozy, human spot with friends and family near by — really puts me in the mood for just one thing: Science Fiction. You heard right. Science Fiction. Of course, I don't mean just any Science Fiction. I don't mean the sort of thing where characters named "Zargon" from places called "Hydra-Gamma III" listen to bald-headed creepozoids in silver BVDs rant about "pure logic." No, the kind of science fiction I'm thinking of is different. Warmer. Richer. More human. On this kind of science fiction adventure, you don't want skin-tight leotards and chrome bikinis. You want big wool sweaters, hiking books, English tweed and pith helmets, with ankle-length skirts and parasols for the ladies. Yes, this is a special brand of science fiction — my favorite kind. Ever since I was a kid, I've always loved the sort of movie where a proper Victorian professor journeys from the smoke-filled adventurer's clubs of London to some impossible lost world in his own gilded or wrought-iron invention. The kind of story that somehow seems to bypass some of the dead-ends of certain other science fiction; seems to allow us to ponder the kind of mysteries science fiction explores so well without asking us to leave our roots in the past behind. I loved it then, and I still love it today.
These words, penned by Rod Bennett in his article Voyages Extraordinaires on Film: A Survey of Fireside Science Fiction, are perhaps the richest summary of that strange, delightful, fantastic, but all-too brief genre called "Scientific Romance."



Thursday, 1 September 2016

Welcome to Voyages Extraordinaires, Volume II!

Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the newly refreshed Voyages Extraordinaires: Scientific Romances in a Bygone Age weblog!

For longtime readers of this weblog, I hope you'll enjoy this new incarnation and the new opportunities for content that it affords. For those of you who are not so familiar, allow me to describe what it is you'll find in the premier electro-tele-kinetographic journal of Victorian-Edwardian Scientific Romances, Retro-Futurism, and Victoriana.

Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Voyages Extraordinaires, Volume II, Coming Soon

Voyages Extraordinaires: Scientific Romances in a Bygone Age will be taking its leave through the course of August for a major restructuring.

For almost nine years, Voyages Extraordinaires has highlighted the best (and worst) in Victorian-Edwardian Scientific Romances, Adventure, Horror, Fantasy, and Retro-Futurism. That is an incredibly long time, especially for any weblog, let alone one that has managed to publish with a regularity that astonishes even me. A lot has happened in the last decade... You've been with me through my trips, my wedding, and the various controversies I've recklessly thrown myself into, all the while amassing a near encyclopedic account of the genre.

After so long, the time feels ripe to freshen-up, revitalize, and otherwise start Voyages Extraordinaires over again. The archives have already been taken down, but do not fear (as though it would have kept you awake at night). Many of my past essays will be republished, and many more will be rewritten and improved. Another thing that has happened in the past decade is that I've become a much better writer and professional weblog manager, thanks in no small part to my other journal, Yesterday, Tomorrow, and Fantasy. This will give me the chance to go back and improve on previous articles, and the presentation of Voyages Extraordinaires as a whole.

Join us back here on September 1st as Voyages Extraordinaires begins anew!